The Takeaway, 5-24-17: How Hillary Clinton’s Party Produced Bernie Sanders

.templateContainer td {padding:0 0 3px;}
05/24/2017
Share:
The Takeaway: Polls and Insights 

Details can be found at realclearpolitics.com

Daily Data Point: How Hillary Clinton’s Party Produced Bernie Sanders 
by David Byler  Why Bernie Sanders? Why in 2016 (and beyond)? For the past two years, virtually everyone who’s interested in Democratic politics has asked some variation of those two questions. Sanders is atypical — he’s consistently to the left of almost all of his Senate colleagues, his rhetoric is populist and he’s not actually a Democrat — yet he was able to win about 43 percent of the vote in the 2016 Democratic presidential primary. And since Donald Trump won the White House, the Vermont senator has remained active in progressive politics, giving his stamp of approval to candidates he thinks are sufficiently liberal. So why did Democratic voters respond so well to someone who is, in some ways, outside their party’s norm? And why didn’t someone like him gain traction in 2008 — and why at this point in time instead of 2020 or 2024? Obviously there’s more than one way to answer these questions, and I’m far from the first to take a stab at them. But I want to add one more high-level explanation to the mix: that Bernie Sanders is, in some fundamental ways, a throwback. Specifically, he embodies the fusion of an older populist style of liberalism and a more modern universalism. This fusion is possible because some of the economic and social factors that previously pushed against Democratic populism have receded since the end of the Cold War and the 2008 financial crash. In other words, some of the forces that caused Democrats to lean away from Harry Truman-esque candidates and toward standard-bearers like Adlai Stevenson may now be gone, allowing populism to reassert itself on the left.

Read the rest of the piece here. 

Daily Polls

 Generic Congressional Vote 
According to an Economist/YouGov poll:

  • 38% of registered voters would vote for a Democrat in the next House of Representatives election, while
  • 36% would vote for a Republican

 Direction of Country 
According to a Monmouth poll:

According to an Economist/YouGov poll:

 Congressional Approval 
According to a Monmouth poll:

  • 17% of registered voters approve of Congress’s job performance, while
  • 73% disapprove

According to an Economist/YouGov poll:

  • 13% of registered voters approve of Congress’s job performance, while
  • 65% disapprove

 Presidential Approval 
According to Gallup:

  • 39% of Americans approve of President Trump’s job performance, while
  • 55% disapprove

According to Rasmussen Reports:

  • 48% of likely voters approve of President Trump’s job performance, while
  • 52% disapprove

According to an Economist/YouGov poll:

  • 40% of registered voters approve of President Trump’s job performance, while
  • 53% disapprove

According to a Quinnipiac poll:

  • 37% of registered voters approve of President Trump’s job performance, while
  • 55% disapprove

 

Copyright © 2017 RealClearHoldings, All rights reserved.
You are receiving this email becuase you opted in at our website.
Our mailing address is:
RealClearHoldings
6160 N Cicero Ave, Chicago, IL
Suite #410

Chicago, IL 60646

Add us to your address book

Leave a Reply